MAC tools for HTML

This page provides some information regarding the software tools that I've used/use to create, edit and publish my web pages. I've been working on these web pages since 1996, and I've been designing web pages since 1993. As my efforts are strictly a hobby, I haven't really delved into the highly commercial aspects of web page design. In other words, I'm not up to date on all the latest programming: Java, JavaScript, PHP and XML. I have done a little cgi-bin/perl scripting, and I find it to be very useful. I don't design web pages for a living; although I do think that would be a cool job. I simply tinker a bit for my own pleasure (and to support residents in my community). This document is an attempt to impart what I hope will be seen as a few words of advice regarding some useful web page design tools for Mac users.

As I use a Mac , my software/advice will be focused towards those using Macs to design web pages. I write and publish my web pages from the desktop of my iMac 27-inch (late 2013). My computer is powereed by a 64 bit, 22nm, fourth generation 'Haswell' chip. The CPU contains a 3.5GHz quad-core i7 processor (4 processors on one chip). with 32Gb of DDR3 SDRAM, 10TB of hard drive storage space, and Mac OS 10.9 (as of 22 Oct, 2013). My web sites are posted to the internet at:

http://www.robsworld.org, http://www.vaessen.net, http://www.vaessen.name, http://www.vaessen.ws,
http://www.tollgatecrossing.org, http://www.southeastaurora-neighborhoodwatch.org, and http://www.damnspammers.com
(My MobileMe/.Mac/iTools web pages were discontinued when Apple pulled out all the plugs on MobileMe in July of 2012.)

If you're a Mac user, and are just learning HTML; then this page might be of some help. I remember how frustrating it was when I first started publishing web pages. Things were never easy, or convenient. I had to hunt for tools, and try them all. Most were buggy and poorly written. It took some time, but I've pretty much got the tool chest nailed down.

Here then, are some of the software tools that I use to create, edit and publish my web pages. Perhaps you'll find something useful in this list.

Author: Robert L. Vaessen e-mail:

 

 

Dreamweaver MX 2004

 
Dreamweaver CS5:
I'm currently using Version 11.0.4 build 4993

I'm currently using Version 11.0.4 build 4993. Apparently there's been a few updates that I didn't know about. I moved from 11.0 build 4964 to 11.0.4 build 4993. I almost never know about these Dreamweaver updates. I'm actually surprised that they released any info for this update. The 11.0.4/4993 update included a BrowserLab extension (it was slated to 'expire' sometime this month (May of 2011)), and some significant security patches (for sftp protocol), so that may explain why the update wasn't announced publicly.

Learning HTML, and creating rich and appealing web sites, can be a difficult endeavor. In February of 2011, I updated my web design work horse. I upgraded from Dreamweaver CS4 to Adobe's latest version of Dreamweaver (as of Feb, 2011). While I find Dreamweaver CS5 to be less of an upgrade than my switch from MX 2004 to CS4, it is a great tool. I've been using Dreamweaver (various different versions) for at least seven years now, and I find it to be the best tool for my needs. I really like the ability to view and work in a WYSIWYG interface, while simultaneously having the code view available for any tweaking or hands-on coding. With my awesome 30" monitor, I can even display both views in a vertical orientation. Aside from the more powerful features (which I'm not knowledgeable enough to use), CS5 introduces some new features that might be useful to a more novice coder such as myself. Those new features include: 'Browser Lab' preview capabilities using side-by-side or 'onion-skin' overlay comparisons of browser rendering. It includes widget plugin capabilities (with HTML5 support). There's a bunch of simple site setup templates and CSS starter pages to jump start your efforts to create new web sites. I've been using Dreamweaver for some time now, and really appreciate some of it's more powerful features. It's a world class champ when it comes to editing HTML tables. With a tool box full of things I've yet to use, I'm sure I'll be learning more about HTML and CSS in the future.
<http://www.adobe.com/products/dreamweaver/>


FYI: If you're developing, editing, authoring websites/html on a Mac, you should know that Dreamweaver (all versions?) will not install or run on a volume formatted with case-sensitivity. That's Crap! Unix file systems (Mac OS X is based on Unix) have been using case sensitive file management since day one (more than 20 years now). Case sensitive volume formatting has been standard on Macs since Leopard came out, and case sensitivity on modern operating systems (including Windows) is an essential part of cross platform interoperability.

The only application (that I know of) that won't work on my case-sensitive volume? Dreamweaver CS5. Dreamweaver's original design (dating back to the late 90s/originally written (for Mac OS) by Macromedia) didn't include case sensitivity in it's library components, and that legacy decision has been carried forward into the latest versions of their software. Macs didn't use case-sensitivity back when Macromedia released the 1.0 version of the software. They didn't implement case sensitivity at that time, and their product was ported to Windows a year after releasing the Mac version. In order to maintain an unchanged code base and compatibility with the Windows operating systems, Macromedia chose not to implement case sensitivity. As a result, to this day Dreamweaver code execution fails to execute/launch on a case sensitive volume. Why does it fail? When application resources look for files with a different case name than the case of the actual file (or the path to its location) the application crashes or fails to launch with error messages.

For example, if an application is looking for a resource with a file path of: /frameworks/Xerces.framework/Versions/A/Xerces and the resource is actually located at: /frameworks/Xerces.framework/versions/a/xerces then the application will fail to launch or function. This is an easily correctable programing problem. Someone needs to re-code the calls for dynamic libraries and resources. The developers/programmers don't need to do very much in order to make the software work on a case sensitive volume, all they need to do is correct the resource calls so that they have the proper case. It is possible to manually fix the problem by renaming all the affected resources. I could manually create case appropriate symbolic links to all the affected resources, but that's not my job! It's Adobe's!

As a result of this issue (which is ENTIRELY adobe's fault and responsibility to fix), I must caution every Mac user who's considering a purchase of Dreamweaver CS5. This application is NOT compatible with standard Lion installations (or any volume that uses case sensitivity). There are many reasons to format your drive as a case-sensitive volume, and Adobe's refusal to update their code libraries in order to correct case-sensitivity errors is just another sign of a company that's failing their customer base.

Due to this case sensitivity issue, I spent eight hours troubleshooting problems with the software, investigating alternatives, trying out alternate html editing programs, and ultimately figured out a work-around. I can launch/run my current copy of Dreamweaver CS5 on my Snow Leopard partition (now I'm glad I kept that Snow Leopard boot partition/it's installed on a case-insensitive volume). All I had to do was re-point Dreamweaver to the site files (the html resources) on my Lion partition.


Recent developments: As of June, 2013, Adobe is no longer selling a perpetual license 'disk' version of DreamWeaver. The latest versions of Dreamweaver (the CC (Creative Cloud) versions) require a monthly subscription fee to use. While I might upgrade to the CS6 version of Dreamweaver (at some point), I will not/will never (I know that's a long time, but it accurately represents my feelings in this regard) upgrade to a 'pay to use' software model. Entertainment sure - Productivity software? Never! Adobe can take their 'Creative Cloud' and jam it! Not only can I not afford their ridiculously high fees, but I'm opposed to the ethics of the matter. They've just priced their product out of the casual/home user market.

 

iWeb

 

iWeb:
I'm using version 3.0.4 (601)

iWeb was Apple's application for HTML authoring/editing. As of July 2012, they've officially EOLd it (End of Life). They don't sell it, host sites produced by it or offer official support for it. Despite the fact that they no longer support the product or host sites created with it, the application still works, and it works quite well). It's powerful, easy to use and well polished. I've been using it more and more in order to create web pages for specific purposes. I don't use it exclusively, but I am starting to use it more and more. As a matter of fact, I'm using it exclusively on two particular web sites that I manage. The best parts of iWeb are it's integration with other Apple applications, the WYSIWYG interface, and the highly professional appearance of the web page outputs. The drawbacks are lack of control in web page export/output, controlling placement of some code/items can be very difficult, and there's no way to view or edit the HTML code from within the application. This last update (version 3.0.4 (601)) improved overall stability and addressed a number of minor issues. Unfortunately, there will never be any future updates to this application - Apple has decided that it doesn't want to produce this kind of software.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IWeb>
<http://www.apple.com/support/iweb/>


 

BBEdit

  BBEdit:
The version that I'm currently running is 10.5.5

This gem was missing from my 'Favs' page for some time. I removed it back in May of 2007. I had decided that Dreamweaver met all my needs. Things have changed. Due to problems with Adobe products (in general), I've decided it's time to bring BBEdit back into the fold. I purchased a new version of BBEdit in October of 2011 (through the Mac 'App Store'). At a discounted introductory price of ~$40; one thing has changed - They've lowered the price to a more manageable target. The full version (through the App Store/and their online store) is only ~$50.00. That's a lot better than their historical pricing of more than $100.00 for the full version. Other notable changes (made to comply with App Store requirements). Command line capability is not included in the version purchased through the App Store. You can download and add that capability outside the App Store. Additionally, the ability to save changes to files that you don't own has been removed from the App Store version. Advanced users can also work around this limitation. In my opinion, the minor changes are well worth the more than 100 new features coupled with the amazing drop in price!

BBEdit is a high-performance HTML and text editor for the Macintosh, and I'm running version 10.5. It's designed and crafted for the editing, searching, transformation, and manipulation of text and code (several different flavors of code/languages). BBEdit provides a vast array of general-purpose features which are useful for a wide variety of tasks, and includes many special purpose features which have been specifically developed in response to the needs of Web authors and software developers. It's an absolute must for any HTML author, code developers and hardcore Mac enthusiasts. My needs for BBEdit no longer revolve around HTML editing. While I still use BBEdit for some of my HTML coding, I primarily use it for plaintext editing. It's ability to search, find, compare, replace text and handle documents is simply unparalleled. The 10.5.5 was a minor update, released to fix a small number of customer reported issues.
<http://www.barebones.com/support/bbedit/arch_bbedit105.html>
<http://www.barebones.com/support/bbedit/updates.html>
<http://www.barebones.com/products/bbedit/>


 

iWork in the iCloud

 

Pages

 

Keynote

 

Numbers

 

Pages

 

Pages

 

Keynote

 

Keynote

 

Numbers

 

Numbers

 

iWork / Apple's Productivity Applications:
Apple's productivity suite is three applications with iCloud integration. I'm running various versions of the component software: The iWork 2013 update (Note that the iWork suite of applications are no longer branded with a year or decimal designator): This is the 'iWork 2013 Update'. I'm running two versions of Apple's Productivity Apps on my desktop and laptops and another version on my iOS devices. The iOS 7.0.3 update delivered new versions of the iCloud enabled applications. The new iOS versions are: Pages 2.0, Numbers 2.0 and Keynote 2.0 (I don't have Keynote 2.0). The Mac OS 10.9 update delivered new versions of the desktop applications. The new desktop versions are: Pages 5, Keynote 6.0 and Numbers 3.0 respectively. These new versions (the new desktop and iOS versions) also came with updated icons.

iWork (Apple's Productivity Applications for the Desktop) now comes in two different flavors. The iWork '09 version, which capped out at Pages 4.3, Numbers 2.3 and Keynote 5.3. Then there's the new 'Apple Productivity Apps' versions. Starting out with Pages 5.0, Numbers 3.0, and Keynote 6.0. The old versions are still available, but they will no longer be updated (they might be patched for security vulnerabilities/bug fixes). The old versions and new versions can coexist on a Mac desktop. The iOS versions continue to work separately, but the new iOS versions will be compatible with the new desktop versions only. In it's current form (which is a confusing mix of desktop, iOS and web-based applications) iWork is a home productivity contender; competing against Microsoft Office and the OpenOffice/LibreOffice productivity suites. Most home users don't need the power provided by Microsoft's productivity suite, and Apple's iWork suite provides a suitable alternative to the expensive Office suite. iWork applications are Office compatible (No it's not 100% compatible, but it can open, edit and save documents as Office documents), and the pricing is far more affordable than the behemoth on the block (The Microsoft applications).

iWork consists of three productivity applications and online integration with Apple's iCloud syncing capability:

Pages - Pages is a word processing application with page layout features. Besides basic word processing functionality, Pages includes over a hundred templates designed by Apple that allow users to create various types of documents, including newsletters, invitations, stationery, and résumés, along with a number of education-themed templates (such as reports and outlines) for students and teachers.

Along with Keynote and Numbers, Pages integrates with Apple's iLife suite. Using the Media Browser, users can drag and drop movies, photos and music directly into documents within the Pages application. A Full Screen view hides the menubar and toolbars, and an outline mode allows users to quickly create outlines which can easily be rearranged by dragging and dropping, as well as collapsed and expanded. Pages includes support for entering complex equations with MathType 6 and for reference citing using EndNote X2.

The Pages application can open and edit Microsoft Word documents (including DOC and Office Open XML files), rich text format documents, and plain text documents. Pages can also export documents in the DOC, PDF, and ePub formats (from WikiPedia). Compatability with other applications and formats is outstanding. Pages 5 (introduced in Oct of 2013) can no longer read or export rich text format documents. Pages 5 adds online collaboration across Macs and iOS devices as well as over the web via iCloud.com. Unfortunately, Pages 5.0 lacks (they were removed) many advanced features, including mail merge, bookmarks, text box linking, advanced find/replace, alternating left-right margins (along with alternating left-right headers and footers), 2-up "page spread" viewing, non-contiguous text selection, and robust Applescript support. Thankfully, you can still use Pages 4.3. I have both versions on my Macs.

Hopefully, some of these features will find their way back into Pages as the new application is developed and subsequent releases bring us improved features.

Keynote - Keynote is an application used to create and play presentations. Its features are comparable to those of Microsoft PowerPoint, though Keynote contains several unique features which differ from similar applications. Keynote, like Pages and Numbers, integrates with the iLife application suite. Users can drag and drop media from iMovie, iTunes, iPhoto and Aperture directly into Keynote presentations using the Media Browser. Keynote contains a number of templates, transitions, and effects. Magic Move allows users to apply simple transitions to automatically animate images and text that are repeated on consecutive slides. With dozens of Themes and Transitions to choose from, you can easily find a series of layouts and effects to help get your project started.

The Keynote Remote application (available in Apple's iOS App Store) lets users view slides and presenter notes and control Keynote presentations with an iPhone or iPod touch over a Wi-Fi network. This Keynote Remote application works with the older version (5.3) of Keynote, but there's no compatability with the new version of Keynote (version 6.0). There's no need for any compatability with the newer version of the desktop app, because now there's an iOS version of Keynote (the iOS 7.0.3 release introduced Keynote for iOS, version 2.0).

Keynote supports a number of file formats. By default, presentations are saved in a Keynote format. Keynote can open and edit Microsoft PowerPoint (.ppt) files. In addition, presentations can be exported as Microsoft PowerPoint files, QuickTime movies (which are also playable on iPod and iPhone), HTML files, and PDF files. Using the previous verion of Keynote (version 5.3), presentations could be sent directly to iDVD, iTunes, GarageBand, iWeb, and to YouTube.

Numbers - Numbers is a spreadsheet application that was added to the iWork suite in 2007 with the release of iWork '08. Numbers, like Microsoft Excel and other spreadsheet applications, lets users organize data into tables, perform calculations with formulas, and create charts and graphs using data entered into the spreadsheet. Numbers, however, differs from other spreadsheet applications in that it allows users to create multiple tables in a single document on a flexible canvas. Many prebuilt templates, including ones designed for personal finance, education, and business use, are included.

Numbers 2, which was included with iWork '09, integrated with other iWork applications. Charts that are pasted into Keynote and Pages are automatically updated across documents when they are changed in Numbers. Additionally, Numbers 2 lets users categorize data in tables by column, which can then be collapsed and summarized (from WikiPedia). This cross-application support was not included in the Numbers 3.0 release (which came with Mac OS 10.9 upgrade). Number 3.0 also added the ability to create interactive charts, and a new user interface resembling the new Keynote and Pages design. Numbers comes with dozens of templates which include embedded formulas, charts and graphs to help you with your planning, tracking and analysis.

The new versions of Pages, Keynote and Numbers all use a completely new file format (as of the iWork update in Oct, 2013 - Released in conjunction with the new Mac OS 10.9 upgrade) that can work across OS X, Windows, and in most web browsers by using the online iCloud web apps. As a result of this change to the basic file format, the current version of iWork (iWork 2013 update) does not open or allow editing of documents created using previous versions. Users who attempt to open older iWork files will see a pop-up telling them to use the previous iWork 09 (which users may or may not have on their machine) version of the application. The current version of iWorks for OS X (the iWorks 2013 versions released with OS X Mavericks 10.9) moves any previously installed iWork 09 apps to an iWork 09 folder on the users machine (in /Applications/iWork '09/), as a work-around to allow users continued use of the earlier suite in order to open and edit older iWork documents locally on their machine.

This complete overhaul and re-design of the iWorks suite changes the application's look and feel, eliminates some advanced features, and makes the old versions incompatible moving forward. These are all draw-backs to the new applications. The iCloud integration should turn into a benefit, but so far Apple hasn't delivered on this iCloud integration. The best part about these new applications? As of September, 2013, Apple has announced that iWork, iMovie and iPhoto would all be available as free downloads on any new iOS devices activated since the 1st of Sep, 2013. So the desktop suite comes free with the Mac OS, and now the iOS apps are free on any new iOS devices. That's good news. That's way cheaper than the $100+ price tag for the Microsoft applications.
<http://www.apple.com/ios/pages/compatibility/>
<http://www.apple.com/iwork-for-icloud/>
<http://www.apple.com/mac/numbers/>
<http://www.apple.com/mac/keynote/>
<http://www.apple.com/ios/numbers/>
<http://www.apple.com/ios/keynote/>
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IWork>
<http://www.apple.com/mac/pages/>
<http://www.apple.com/ios/pages/>
<http://www.apple.com/icloud/>


 

GraphicConverter

 
GraphicConverter:
I'm currently using version 8.8.3 (b1381)

One of my favorite pieces of software recently released an update. GraphicConverter moves ever forward. One more step towards perfection. Another product that's always getting better. With the move to Lion compatibility, Thorsten (the developer) discontinued the separate Native PowerPC version of GC. The old/PowerPC versions will still continue to work on Mac OS systems from 10.3 - 10.6, but moving forward, you'll have to use the Intel only versions.

GraphicConverter is an image converter and editor. A fantastic piece of shareware that is well worth the price (~$40.00). I use it to convert image formats into web standard formats; to create and edit image maps and other graphics. I've been singing GC's praises for many years now, and I'm not sure what I would do without it. The best part about GC is it's creator/author. Thorsten Lemke is completely committed to his customer base. Constantly and Continuously responding to customer recommendations and bug reports. GC is a dynamic, evolving, application. Always on the cutting edge, an absolute must in any web developers tool box. At a fraction of PhotoShop's cost (and no monthly subscription fees!), this photo editor puts a huge wrench in your toolbox.

The full release version: 8.6 (b1200) finally introduced layers proper to the toolkit; putting GraphicConverter on an ever closer footing with the likes of PhotoShop at a fraction of the price. A priceless application with all the bells and whistles of the top end editors.
<http://www.lemkesoft.de/en/products/graphic-converter/key-features/>


 

DVDPedia

 

DVDPedia:
Running version 5.2

DVDPedia is a great little application for cataloging and displaying your movie collection. It's list of features is impressive, and it keeps getting better with every update. The database is capable of generating statistics, you can keep track of multiple collections, you can easily add titles by typing the name of the movie or you can scan the barcode (using your iSight camera or a barcode reader) right off the movie box (it then searches the internet, and displays choices). It has customizable HTML export capabilities, a 'borrowed' feature with address book integration, the ability to play movies in full screen mode, and many more features which make an awesome addition to your software library. I use DVDpedia to generate HTML listings of my movies and movie reviews.

The 5.0 upgrade was a paid upgrade/new version of the software (The new version only runs on Intel architecture machines and it requires Leopard or better as an OS). This version has been over a year in the making with lots of changes big and small to make the programs even better. What's new? Lots of new search sites including Wikipedia, Freebase and Doghouse, the Pedias' own media server built by and for Pedia users. New custom fields for broader cataloging options: TV series for DVDpedia, comics for Bookpedia and board games for Gamepedia (I may have to buy a copy now) as well as new custom fields including dedicated date fields, check boxes and multi-value fields. A 10-star rating system with half-stars; click twice on a star to make it a half. Swipe gestures for the CoverFlow and Add/Edit window to move back and forth as well as pinch-to-zoom in the Grid view. A new filter feature for the Details view and Statistics to quickly find entries with that same value. And much, much more… Below are links to some of the pages I created using this software.
<http://www.robsworld.org/iphonemoviecollection/index.html>
<http://www.robsworld.org/mymovies/index.html>
<http://www.robsworld.org/reviews.html>
<http://www.bruji.com/version5.html>
<http://www.bruji.com/dvdpedia/>
<http://doghouse.bruji.com/>


 

CDPedia

 

CDPedia:
Running version 5.2

CDPedia is a great little application for cataloging and displaying your music collection. It's list of features is impressive, and it keeps getting better with every update. The database is capable of generating statistics, you can keep track of multiple collections, you can easily add titles by typing the name of the artist, album, or track. You can scan the barcode (using your iSight camera or a barcode reader) right off a jewel case (it then searches the internet, and displays choices), or you can import lists of music from iTunes. It has customizable HTML export capabilities, a 'borrowed' feature with address book integration, and many more features which make an awesome addition to your software library. I use CDPedia to generate HTML listings of my music.

The 5.0 upgrade was a paid upgrade/new version of the software (The new version only runs on Intel architecture machines and it requires Leopard or better as an OS). This version has been over a year in the making with lots of changes big and small to make the programs even better. What's new? Lots of new search sites including Wikipedia, Freebase and Doghouse, the Pedias' own media server built by and for Pedia users. New custom fields for broader cataloging options: TV series for DVDpedia, comics for Bookpedia and board games for Gamepedia (I may have to buy a copy now) as well as new custom fields including dedicated date fields, check boxes and multi-value fields. A 10-star rating system with half-stars; click twice on a star to make it a half. Swipe gestures for the CoverFlow and Add/Edit window to move back and forth as well as pinch-to-zoom in the Grid view. A new filter feature for the Details view and Statistics to quickly find entries with that same value. And much, much more… Below are links to some of the pages I created using this software.
<http://www.robsworld.org/iphonemusiccollection/index.html>
<http://www.robsworld.org/mymusic/index.html>
<http://www.bruji.com/version5.html>
<http://www.bruji.com/cdpedia/>
<http://doghouse.bruji.com/>


 

Bookpedia

 

Bookpedia:
Running version 5.2

Bookpedia is a great little application for cataloging and displaying your book collection(s). It's list of features is impressive, and it keeps getting better with every update. The database is capable of generating statistics, you can keep track of multiple collections, you can easily add titles by typing the name of the author, book, or isbn number. You can scan the barcode (using your iSight camera or a barcode reader) right off the book cover (the application searches the internet, and displays choices). It has customizable HTML export capabilities, a borrowed feature with address book integration, and many more features which make an awesome addition to your software library. I use Bookpedia to generate an HTML listing of my favorite books.

The 5.0 upgrade was a paid upgrade/new version of the software (The new version only runs on Intel architecture machines and it requires Leopard or better as an OS). This version has been over a year in the making with lots of changes big and small to make the programs even better. What's new? Lots of new search sites including Wikipedia, Freebase and Doghouse, the Pedias' own media server built by and for Pedia users. New custom fields for broader cataloging options: TV series for DVDpedia, comics for Bookpedia and board games for Gamepedia (I may have to buy a copy now) as well as new custom fields including dedicated date fields, check boxes and multi-value fields. A 10-star rating system with half-stars; click twice on a star to make it a half. Swipe gestures for the CoverFlow and Add/Edit window to move back and forth as well as pinch-to-zoom in the Grid view. A new filter feature for the Details view and Statistics to quickly find entries with that same value. And much, much more… Below is a link to a page I created using this software.
<http://www.robsworld.org/books.html>
<http://www.bruji.com/version5.html>
<http://www.bruji.com/bookpedia/>
<http://doghouse.bruji.com/>


 

Art Text 2

 

Art Text 2:
Running version 2.4.3 (451)

Art Text is a Mac OS X application for creating high quality textual graphics, headings, logos, icons, web site elements and buttons. Thanks to multi layer support creating complex graphics is no sweat. This software allows you to create great looking title graphics for print or the web. Create catchy headings and other text graphics. Generate attractive buttons and cool titles to make your web site look stylish and professional. Various logos and icons can be easily created to enrich your brochures, flyers and postcards. I've put together a page with a few samples (my own designs). If you'd like to see more samples, you may find the developers website provides more and 'better' examples.
<http://www.belightsoft.com/products/arttext/overview.php>

I purchased Art Text 2 as a replacement for 'The Logo Creator'; an application I used for many years (From 2005 (or earlier) up until July of 2011). Unfortunately, the developer took a long time (more than a year) to make the application compatible with Lion, and I needed an application to help me create logos, titles and graphics. I waited patiently, but the promise of an update didn't come true, and I wasn't notified when the Mac update finally was released (in late 2012). I only found out about the update (to work with OS 10.7) when I happened to make some routine updates on this web page (in February of 2013 / More than two years after I replaced the application). In Feb of 2012, I added Art Text 2 to my Software Favorites page, and removed The Logo Creator.



 

Logoist

 

Logoist:
Running version 1.2.3

Logoist is a Mac OS X application for creating high quality textual graphics, headings, logos, icons, web site elements and buttons. Thanks to its multi layer support (just like Photo Shop and other high end layout applications), creating complex graphics is no sweat. This software allows you to create awsesome title graphics for print or the web. Create catchy headings and other text graphics. Generate attractive buttons and cool titles to make your web site look stylish and professional. Various logos and icons can be easily created to enrich your brochures, flyers and postcards. I've put together a page with a few samples (my own designs). If you'd like to see more samples, you may find the developers website provides more and 'better' examples.
<http://www.syniumsoftware.com/logoist/>


 

Transmit

 
Transmit:
I have a registered copy of version 4.4.5

An FTP tool that does it all. Anyone who publishes web pages eventually needs a way to upload their pages to a web site. I've found that stand alone FTP tools are the best for this task. Transmit has a clean and easy to use interface, and some really nifty features, like the ability to resume a transfer that's been interrupted, advanced site synchronization capabilities (with simulation mode and reporting capabilities), Amazon S3 integration, sync your favorites using Dropbox, drag-to-dock sending, creation / use of transfer droplets, column views, quick navigation side-bar, multi-connection transfers, built in compression, a built in text editor, remote file editing using local editors, and secure transfer (in various different flavors) capabilities. Check out the Panic.com Release Notes for Transmit.
<http://www.panic.com/transmit/>
<http://www.panic.com/transmit/releasenotes.html>


 

Safari

 

Safari:
I'm currently running Version 7.0 (9537.71)

Apple's default web browser for OS X (also available for Windows!), is way ahead of the pack. Apple's browser contains a plethora of incredibly powerful features, and this release moves the browser forward for everyone (there's even a Windows version! - Microsoft stoped developing IE for Mac, and Apple makes a Windows version of Safari?). I'm currently running Version 7.0 (1816).

Battle of the browsers. Internet Explorer vs FireFox. Those are your choices right? Wrong! Think different! Think Mac! A fast but full featured browser, which performs like a pro. The full release version is a powerful workhorse - Featuring tabbed browsing, URL snap-back, a powerful but elegant bookmark implementation (with built-in import capability), Google, Yahoo and Bing search integration, built-in pop-up blocker, multiple standards (HTML 4.01, HTML 5, XML, XPath, XSLT, XHTML, DOM, CSS, CSS3, ECMA Script, Proxy Support, SSL, TLS, JavaScript, Java, plus QuickTime, Flash and Shockwave plug-ins), Top sites - A visual representation of your top visited sites. Cover Flow - A fantastic new way to visualize your bookmarks. Safari Reader mode - banish all those annoying sidebars and adds. Expanded support for HTML 5 and the new JavaScript Nitro Engine implementation - Makes Safari the fastest in the pack.

Some of the newest features (under the 7.0 release) include: Improved performance for JavaScript and memory usage. A new look for the Top Sites (shows page thumbnails in a grid) and the sidebar (which now includes bookmarks, a reading list, and new social links), A new Shared Links feature. New power saver feature which pauses unused plugins (when not in use). Safari also works seamlessly with the new iCloud Keychain; autofilling credit card info and passwords and syncing that secure info across all you Mac and iOS devices. This time around, Apple really focused on making Safari more memory efficient and reduced it's power consumption. Keeping Flash from constantly running, keeping looping videos and graphics from sucking up your memory and battery life.

By the way, Safari is fully compliant (it was the first Browser to meet that bench mark) with the advanced Acid 3.0 test. So, if you're concerned about standards and compliance, you've nothing to worry about. Develop your web site using the Safari webkit and you won't have to worry about rendering problems or sticky browser compatibility issues. Check out the website for more info. Safari is just one more reason to Switch! It's won a place as my default browser, give it a chance and it'll soon be yours. This particular update (6.1) has no new features, just security fixes and updates.
<https://developer.apple.com/technologies/safari/whats-new.html>
<https://developer.apple.com/technologies/safari/>
<http://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202844>
<http://www.webstandards.org/action/acid3>
<http://www.apple.com/safari/features.html>
<http://support.apple.com/en-us/HT6074>
<http://www.apple.com/html5/>
<http://www.apple.com/safari/>


 

X11

 

X11/XQuartz:

Note: Regarding 'X', 'X11' 'XQuartz' and all Unix native apps on the Mac. As of Mac OS 10.8 / Mountain Lion (released 25 July 2012), the operating system no longer contains native support for the X Windowing System. (i.e. X11). Apple's OS X is still capable of running X/X11/XQuartz and Unix native applications, but they're no longer directly supporting those capabilities/functionality. They're relying on 2nd party developers to update all 'X' related products/capabilities. It's a shame to see Apple drop it's native support of the X environment/capabilities, but thankfully, there are developers like the team that works on XQuartz who have a passion for this unix product. As of 30 July, 2012. I've updated all my Macs to OS 10.8/Mountain Lion, and I've decided that I will no longer need to run any Unix native apps (such as The Gimp, Inkscape, the XQuartz windowing environment and other applications) on my Mac. As a result, I removed all such apps from my 'Favorites' page.


Many of the icons you see on this page were not created by the Author listed below. They were culled from various parent application resource files, or downloaded from the software producers website. They are copyrighted by the respective application authors.

Author: Robert L. Vaessen e-mail:
Last Updated:
This page has been accessed times since 31 Dec 99.